Boost conversions by improving your local presence

Aug 16, 17 Boost conversions by improving your local presence

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A recent study Google shows that there is little to no correlation between usage or traffic and influence. What the study shows is that even if people find your business online, it does not mean that they will choose your business for their purchase. Both consumer experience and content matter to customers. However, there is another factor that plays a large role in a consumers decision, and that is distance. In a study by the national consumer study on how consumers were willing to travel for shopping, the vast majority of shoppers (93.2%) would not travel more than 20 minutes for everyday items. The distance drops further when you look at urban shoppers. 92% would not travel more than 15 minutes. Shoppers also prioritize distance over factors like price and quality. 32% of respondents cited quality and price for both factors, only when the distance is no longer part of the equation. The distance consumers are willing to travel gets much shorter when the nature of the items change. Consumers will travel a maximum of six minutes for gas, eight to nine minutes for fast food and groceries, while home and garden increase time to 15 minutes. All of these facts show the importance of creating and maintaining a local presence online. When a consumer searches online, when your site comes up in a search result, it must be the local listing, with proper directions, descriptions, and...

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Google and YouTube rank videos differently 56% of the time

Jul 10, 17 Google and YouTube rank videos differently 56% of the time

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One of the highlights of a new study on video ranking on both Google and YouTube was the difference between how each ranks the same videos. When comparing the same search query, the ranking between Google and YouTube was different 56% of the time. The outcome of the study is quite surprising, given that the search elements of both companies are run by the same backend. Even when the search result has only one video on Google, a different video was shown first on YouTube at least half of the time. The current theory is that the results illustrate the difference between the intentions of both services. Google exists to serve the most relevant information for the search query. The search engine’s algorithm most likely places emphasis on relevance above all else. YouTube, on the other hand, exists to entertain visitors. The end-goal is to keep a visitor on-site for as long as possible. The longer the visitor stays, the more ads they will see. These two vastly different goals probably explain the larger difference between the search results. It is also important for any organizations looking to expand their presence in video. Ranking in Google will require prioritizing relevance while ranking on YouTube will mean creating videos that are relevant and entertaining. A good video campaign should produce content for both, taking advantage of the very different audiences that visit each...

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Two methods of smaller sites outranking bigger ones

Dec 08, 16 Two methods of smaller sites outranking bigger ones

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Article Written by : ADWORKS 24 Look at almost any search result for popular keywords and you will see that the sites that rank at the top are the biggest ones. Often, that is the ideal result for the search query. The Google algorithm does favor the larger sites over small ones, just from the sheer number of pages. We have seen that some smaller sites do outrank the larger ones. They manage to do it even for extremely popular keywords. Here are two ways a smaller site can outrank a much larger one: Method one – the long tail This strategy involves only chasing the long tail keywords. Long tail keywords are those that at least three words or more. To be classified as a long tail keyword, we are looking at five words on average. The reason the largest sites avoid these now is that they rely on the larger keyword pages to rank for the long tail automatically. However, a page optimized specifically for the long tail will outrank that page.  Even though the traffic might seem much less, there are other linked searches for which traffic will come in. Method two – 10x content There is a concept in growth hacker circles called 10x content. These are large articles that are well written and comprehensive to every aspect of the subject matter. For example, a page that is targeting “best practices for job applicants” will need to tailor the content to cover the applicant, the HR manager, and even the HR director and each of their unique requirements from this...

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What does Google want in a website

Sep 25, 16 What does Google want in a website

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Article Written by : WM SEO How do you build and run the perfect website the way Google sees it? This has always been a tough question to answer. Until now. Thanks in large part to the various announcements that Google makes about changes to search, we can now build an image of what type of site will rank well in Google. Here is what they have said in the recent past: From the announcement post for Google Penguin, we get: “focus on creating amazing, compelling web sites”. Then from the link schemes page: “The best way to get other sites to create high-quality, relevant links to yours is to create unique, relevant content that can naturally gain popularity in the Internet community. Creating good content pays off: Links are usually editorial votes given by choice, and the more useful content you have, the greater the chances someone else will find that content valuable to their readers and link to it.”. Finally, from the webmaster guidelines, we get: “Think about what makes your website unique, valuable, or engaging. Make your website stand out from others in your field.” The message here is loud and clear. Google wants Quality in every aspect of the website. From the design to the content, it demands quality. This is not limited to the website itself. It wants you to get quality links, from quality websites to your quality content. The problem is most websites are built backward. People go looking for links before they have anything of quality. The message here is to build a site full of great content and then do your outreach. There are sites that update once every month or two but still rank high because they have hundreds of links. This is the type of quality Google is looking...

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Google AMP reaches 125 million documents

May 22, 16 Google AMP reaches 125 million documents

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The accelerated mobile pages (AMP for short) standard by Google appears to be gaining traction with publishers. The standard, is meant to make pages smaller and reduce loading times. It achieves this in two ways. Firstly by narrowing down the technologies used and secondly by serving the pages from Google’s own servers. Here is a bit more detail from Wired: “To use AMP, you create an alternate version of your site that conforms to the specifications published by the AMP project. These standards are a lot like traditional HTML, but pared down to what Google considers to be the bare minimum. Typically you’ll give your AMP-optimized site a separate address, for example: yoursite.com/yourpage/amp. If you use WordPress, there’s actually a plugin will automatically create these alternate versions and help Google find them. But you could, theoretically, just replace your whole site with AMP optimized pages and it would still work in most modern web browsers, though it might be a bit drab.” Now it appears that more and more publishers are adopting the standard to serve on mobile devices. At Google IO 2016, Richard Gingras announced Google has indexed AMP pages on over 125 million documents from more than 640,000 domains across the web. In addition they also announced that updates to the Google Search app on both iOS and Android will now show AMP pages in the results. Recipes and other verticals will also start showing AMP pages by default wherever they...

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Google Confirms Key Ranking Factors

Mar 14, 16 Google Confirms Key Ranking Factors

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We have all known for some time now that links, the anchor text of those links and the number of links always played a key part in determining ranking on Google. These are part of a 200 signal ranking recipe that places varying levels of importance on each signal. We have never known how important one signal is over the other, let alone what the most important one is, until now. When a Search Quality Senior Strategist at Google (Andrey Lipattsev) was asked what the top two ranking factors were, he answered: “I can tell you what they are. It is content. And it’s links pointing to your site.”. We now know that the content on your site is the most important factor followed by the links to you site. In addition to the above we also got more information on whether click through rates affect ranking: Google engineer Paul Haahr revealed some of these new signals. Specifically, Paul revealed that: 1. Google runs A/B tests with the SERPs. So if you drop or go up 1-2 spots, it may have nothing to do with links, on-page SEO, etc. It could be a test. 2. Google definitely uses click-through-rate (CTR) data as a ranking signal. This lays to rest a long held belief that Google does consider end user behavior when ranking. With this news, there will be even more focus on bounce rate, as any visitor that clicks through to your page and then clicks back could be detrimental to your ranking. It is quite possible that with these ranking signal confirmations, Google is clearly telling webmasters that better content will result in better...

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