Setting up AMP for WordPress

Mar 05, 18 Setting up AMP for WordPress

Posted by in SEO

AMP is Google’s new standard for lightweight content distribution. Google, indexes sites with AMP content and serves the pages (and ads) from its servers. In some cases, Google even preloads the pages with AMP from its search results. AMP pages look basic, have no styling and use standard fonts, but make content access much faster. Here is a guide on getting AMP up and running on your WordPress installation: Plugin Getting AMP compatible pages on your WordPress installation is as simple as installing and activating the plugin from Automattic. Once you do, all posts will be AMP compatible. You can test the pages by adding /amp/ to the end of the URL of any post. Getting pages to work with AMP requires a separate plugin to install. Analytics The next step is to add your AMP pages to your analytics profile. Login to your Google Analytics dashboard and get the tracking ID from the “tracking info” section under account properties. The should begin with UA. Enter this tracking ID in the AMP plugin under analytics. Test Now that you have an operational AMP page setup, we need to test and make sure everything works correctly. The first tool you can use Is the Google Amp Rest. Go to the tool and enter your URL and hit “run test.” Another option is to use the developer tools in Chrome. Open the tools and go to the “Console” tab. Here you will if there are any validation errors for you AMP...

read more

Google AMP reaches 125 million documents

May 22, 16 Google AMP reaches 125 million documents

Posted by in Social Media

The accelerated mobile pages (AMP for short) standard by Google appears to be gaining traction with publishers. The standard, is meant to make pages smaller and reduce loading times. It achieves this in two ways. Firstly by narrowing down the technologies used and secondly by serving the pages from Google’s own servers. Here is a bit more detail from Wired: “To use AMP, you create an alternate version of your site that conforms to the specifications published by the AMP project. These standards are a lot like traditional HTML, but pared down to what Google considers to be the bare minimum. Typically you’ll give your AMP-optimized site a separate address, for example: yoursite.com/yourpage/amp. If you use WordPress, there’s actually a plugin will automatically create these alternate versions and help Google find them. But you could, theoretically, just replace your whole site with AMP optimized pages and it would still work in most modern web browsers, though it might be a bit drab.” Now it appears that more and more publishers are adopting the standard to serve on mobile devices. At Google IO 2016, Richard Gingras announced Google has indexed AMP pages on over 125 million documents from more than 640,000 domains across the web. In addition they also announced that updates to the Google Search app on both iOS and Android will now show AMP pages in the results. Recipes and other verticals will also start showing AMP pages by default wherever they...

read more